Can't change IP address

Let’s see if I can get an answer without an argument…

I’m changing out my network to support VLAN per recommendation by SkyKing. Everything works, I can get all the phones on the VLAN but when I go to change the IP address of the FreePBX using the GUI, It says it changes but it really doesn’t. The original address was 192.168.13.13. I change that to 192.168.1.13 and hit save, I still have to use 192.168.13.13 to access it and it still shows 192.168.1.13 in the address field.

If I reboot the machine, there is an error while shutting down that says my MAC address doesn’t match, but it’s ignoring that. However, when it comes back up, it says it can’t assign ANY address to my eth0 adapter. I have manually punch in the 192.168.13.13 through command line before I can access it again.

I was soooo close to having this finished. I had to change everything back to no VLAN so we could continue functioning.

What am I missing?

Thanks for being…kind…

VLAN’s are “Virtual” LAN’s so they use the same physical interface as standard interfaces, they are however not directly connected, you will need to route between them, you will have a lot of problems using the same address space for your eth0 and your eth0:512 (or whatever) if the GUI doesn’t recognize the other VLAN interface, then don’t use it, there are over 121 recipes for how to do it in Redhat based environments.

(and 115 say the same thing :wink: )

Are you trying to tag the voice VLAN? The interface on your switch needs to be in trunk for the server and all the phones. That way you plug a standard device in it only sees the untagged frames on the data VLAN.

I would not use sysadmin. https://sites.google.com/site/ghidit/how-to-2/configure-vlans-on-centos

Sorry, maybe I provided a bit too much info.

The main problem has nothing to do with VLAN’s…at least I don’t think it does. I can’t change the IP address on the freePBX box. If I change it from 192.168.13.13 to 192.168.13.14, click save, it changes in the GUI but I still have to access it on the original IP. Then, when rebooting, it has no IP address at all until I manually assign one through console command line. Weird.

Just to clarify, Are you saying don’t use 192.x.x.x for the VLAN2 address? I was going to use 10.x.x.x but was later told that it doesn’t matter.

I was doing it for simplicity on my part but it’s no big deal to change it to 10.x.x.x if that will work better.

I would not use sysadmin either. https://sites.google.com/site/ghidit/how-to-2/configure-vlans-on-centos

TM100 gets annoyed with me but I hate setting IP’s in sysadmin or any other GUI.

If I go edit the text file then do a ‘service network restart’ or an ifup and ifdown I see the script parsed and any possible errors and the immediate feedback of knowing it worked. When I click the button on a web page I always hold my breath that everything works on the back end. It is very complicated to get web pages to interact with root controlled files and FreePBX can’t write back to the screen for root processes like it does in backup so you just have no clue what happens. Then when it times out or doesn’t work I end up at the prompt anyway. If you work on your own system I am sure the GUI for system stuff is a godsend. If you do this for a living you should know how to use the OS.

BTW, the GUI works great on DB stuff and is a marvel and writing dial plans. I never worry about hitting submit even when doing complicated edits. Once I was shown how elegant the FreePBX framework integrates modules into the dialplan it really is an amazing thing. If you ever want to appreciate it take two phones and create a dialplan in Asterisk just for basic calls. It is very tedious.

FreePBX rocks!

That is excellent information and very true. I just spent the last several hours discovering that very problem. I can’t trust the GUI for network config changes. It will make you crazy.

I finally got it back to working normally again. Now, to learn how to create a virtual interface through command line…

I sent you the link on how to create the sub interfaces (they are not virtual, they are bound to a physical interface IE: eth0:115)