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Add RAID1 after install?


(John G) #1

I’m looking for some guidance on adding RAID1 to a system after installation. Basically, I used SNG7-PBX-64bit-1805-1 to install to a system with two 80GB Western Digital Blue drives that looked fairly identical, but were made about a year apart. Unfortunately, FreePBX did not consider them identical (they formatted to slightly different sizes) and therefore did not auto-configure them for RAID.

So, I’ve now got it installed on one drive (the ever-so-slightly smaller one, so there should be room to clone everything on the other drive). Is there a guide on how to do this after the fact? I searched, but all I could find was this:

https://wiki.freepbx.org/display/PPS/How+to+Setup+Software+Raid+after+the+fact

…which is pretty clearly out of date.

I can find generic Linux guides for doing this, but they all assume that you just have normal /dev/sdX partitions to deal with. With FreePBX, we have /dev/mapper/SangomaVG-root – so I wasn’t sure if I could follow one of those guides without messing something up.

If someone could provide some instructions and/or update the Wiki for the current Stable release, that would be great. Thank you!


(John G) #2

Bump? Anyone? Any guidance on doing this?

Seems odd that the default install does this by default – but there is so little info (just a very outdated Wiki for a previous version) on how to enable it after the install.

I agree it is an important part of the system – which is why they do it by default at install if the same size drives are detected – so it seems like it would be fairly often that someone might want to add it after the install if the install didn’t do it properly.

Hopefully someone can give me some guidance on this? Even if it is just telling me to use a generic RH or CentOS linux guide – but let me know how to deal with /dev/mapper/SangomaVG-root?

Thank you!


#3

Google found this. You could use it as a starting point at your own risk. Even though it is based on Ubuntu, the process should be fairly similar on Centos.


(system) #4

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